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Syllabus 

Master of Computer Application (MCA)

Assam Science and Technology University (ASTU)

 

 

1st Semester subjects

Paper

Subject Name

L

T

P

Credits

Theory Subjects

CA132101

Introductory Programming (IP)  

3

2

0

4

CA132102

Digital Systems (DS)

3

2

0

4

CA132103

Theory of Computer Science(TCS)

3

2

0

4

CA132104

Accounting and financial management (AFM)

3

2

0

4

CA132105

Computer oriented numerical methods(CONM)

3

2

0

4

Practical Subjects

CA132116

Laboratory-I (LAB-1)

0

0

10

5

Total Contact Hrs : 35 ; Total Credits : 25 ;

 

 

2nd Semester subjects

Paper

Subject Name

L

T

P

Credits

Theory Subjects

CA132201

Data and File Structure (DFS)

3

2

0

4

CA132202

Computer  Architecture  and Organization (CAO)

3

2

0

4

CA132203

Computer based optimization techniques (CBOT)

3

2

0

4

CA132204

Graph Theory (GT)

3

2

0

4

CA132205

Probability and Statistics (PS)

3

2

0

4

Practical Subjects

CA132216

Laboratory-II (LAB-2)

0

0

10

5

Total Contact Hrs : 35 ; Total Credits : 25 ;

 

 

3rd Semester subjects

Paper

Subject Name

L

T

P

Credits

Theory Subjects

CA132301

System Software (SS)

3

2

0

4

CA132302

Database Management Systems -I(DBMS)

3

2

0

4

CA132303

Management Information System(MIS)

3

2

0

4

CA132304

Object Oriented Programming and Design (OOPD)

3

2

0

4

CA132305

Computer Graphics & Multimedia(CGM)

3

2

0

4

Practical Subjects

CA132316

Laboratory-III (LAB-3)

0

0

10

5

Total Contact Hrs : 35 ; Total Credits : 25 ;

 

 

4th   Semester subjects

Paper

Subject Name

L

T

P

Credits

Theory Subjects

CA132401

Operating Systems (OS)

3

2

0

4

CA132402

Software Engineering(SE)

3

2

0

4

CA132403

Database Management Systems -II(DBMS)

3

2

0

4

CA132404

Computer Network (CN)

3

2

0

4

CA132405

Design and Analysis of Algorithms (DAA)

3

2

0

4

Practical Subjects

CA132416

Laboratory-IV (LAB-4)

0

0

10

5

Total Contact Hrs : 35 ; Total Credits : 25 ;

 

 

5th   Semester subjects

Paper

Subject Name

L

T

P

Credits

Theory Subjects

CA132501

Data Warehousing and Data Mining(DWDM)

3

2

0

4

CA132502

Web Technology (WT)

3

2

0

4

CA132503

Artificial Intelligence(AI)

3

2

0

4

CA132504

Elective-I

3

2

0

4

CA132505

Elective-II

3

2

0

4

Practical Subjects

CA132526

Minor Project

0

0

10

5

Total Contact Hrs : 35 ; Total Credits : 25 ;

 

 

6th   Semester subjects

Paper

Subject Name

Total Project duration and work hours

Credits

Subjects

CA132621

System Development Project (Internal Evaluation)

15 Weeks to be devoted for the project work

10

CA132622

System Development Project (External Evaluation)

15

Total Contact Hrs : 30 ; Total Credits : 25 ;

 

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS:

                                                                                             

Elective –I (CA132504)

 Elective-II (CA132505)

a)     Microprocessor and Embedded Design(MED)

b)     Distributed Systems(DS)

c)     Expert Systems(ES)

d)     Image Processing(IP)

e)     Biologically Implied Computing(BIC)

f)      Programming Language and Paradigms(PLP)

 

a)     Cryptography and Network Security (CNS)

b)     Information Storage and Retrieval (ISR)

c)     Multimedia Systems(MS)

d)     Simulation and Modeling(SM)

e)     Remote Sensing and GIS(RSG)

f)      Mobile Computing(MC)

 

MCA 1ST SEMESTER SYLLABUS

 

Paper                : CA132101

Subject Name    : INTRODUCTORY PROGRAMMING

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre–requisite     :  NIL

 

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. It also aims to help students, regardless of their major, to feel justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals. The course uses the C programming language. This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. It also aims to help students, regardless of their major, to feel justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals. The course uses the C programming language.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Understand the methodology of problem solving using algorithms.

2.     Write Programs using C language and thus debug and run the programs using C Compilers.

3.     Understand and implement basic data structures and their representations using arrays, pointers, structures and defined types.

4.     Write programs that read text data from files and write data from memory to text files.

5.     Solve scientific and numerical problems using C language.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

(i)

Introduction to Programming ,Programming methodology, Types of Programming Languages , Assembler, Compiler and Interpreter, Programming development steps and tools ,Structure of a C program, The C keywords, Identifiers, Constants, Variables, C Data types, dynamic initialization, type modifiers, type conversions, constant and volatile variables

2

 

(ii)

Properties of Operators, Operator Priority, conditional operators, arithmetic, relational, assignment operators and expressions, logical, bitwise operators.

Input and output in c: Formatted and Unformatted functions, Library functions.

1

 

(iii)

Control statement: if statement, if-else, nested if else, if-else-if ladder, break, continue, got, Switch statement. Loop control statement.

1

2

(i)

Arrays: Array initialization, array terminology, characteristics of an array, 1-D array and its operations, Multi -dimensional arrays. Strings: string standard functions.

2

 

(ii)

Pointers, void pointers, arithmetic operations with pointers, pointers and arrays, array of pointers, pointers to pointers, pointers and strings. Dynamic memory allocation, memory allocation functions.

2

3

(i)

Function, call by value, call by reference, and function as an argument, Functions with arrays and Pointers, Recursion-Types of Recursion, Recursion versus Iterations, Advantages and Disadvantages of Recursion, Efficiency of Recursion.

2

4

(i)

Preprocessor Statement and macros:#define, #include , #line,  #finder , #error , #line , #pragma Directive.

1

 

(ii)

User Define Datatypes:Structure,  Enumerated Data Type, Union,Typedef.

1

5

(i)

File Handling  in C: Storing, creating, retrieving, updating Sequential, relative, indexed and random access mode, Files with binary mode (Low level), performance of Sequential Files. File operation: creation, copy, delete, update, text file, binary file.

2

Books:

1.

Dromey, G.: How to solve it by computer, PHI(EEE), 1985

 

 

2.

Kanetkar,  Let us C, BPB

 

 

3.

Jeri, Elliot: Problem Solving and Programming Design in C, Pearson

 

 

4.

Balaguruswamy:  Programming in  ANSI C, TMGH

 

 

5

 Balagurusamy : Fundamentals Of Computers,TMH

 

 

6

Venugopal : Mastering C, TMH

 

           

 

                                     

 

Paper                : CA132102

Subject Name    : DIGITAL SYSTEMS

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  NIL

 

This course covers the fundamentals of the electronic circuits that are used to build computers, and outlines the software components that support their use. From the functions of individual transistors, it constructs a complete implementation of a simple processor, explaining in a structured way how complex behaviors are built up from simpler parts. This is followed by an overview of the software components of a complete computer system. Students will gain an understanding of the factors that affect the performance of hardware, and how these factors change with changes of scale, for example in the size of the data that a computer system handles. They will also gain experience in the important technique of hierarchical specification, implementation and proof of correctness using logic and data representation. Impel design of combinational and sequential circuits; standard design elements. Computer arithmetic for integers and floating-point numbers; basic error analysis. Register transfer level design of a simple microprocessor. Simple programming in assembly language. Role of assemblers, compilers and linkers. Memory hierarchy.

 

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Represent the number in any number system and thus have clean idea about computer arithmetic’s.

2.     Design optimized Combinational Circuits with logic gates.

3.     Design optimized sequential circuits with logic gates.

4.     Have an idea about inner functioning of electronics devices and simple computers.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Representation of Information: Number System: Binary, octal, hexadecimal; Positive and negative numbers; fixed point and floating point quantities. Arithmetic operations: Addition, subtraction. Character codes: ASCII and EBCDIC, Redundant coding for error detection and correction: Concept of parity codes, Hamming Codes (SEC-DEC)0 and distance.

3

2

2.1

Logic Design: Boolean  algebra,  Boolean  variables  and  functions-  canonical  and  standard  forms,  truth table, minimization of Boolean functions- Karnaugh map, tabulation methods..

2

 

2.2

Combinational logic circuits: AND, OR, NAND, NOR and NOT gates and tri-state buffer; Implementation of Boolean functions using logic gates; Multiplexers, decoders, encoders, simple arithmetic and logic circuits.

4

3

 

Sequential circuits: flip-flops, shift registers and counters- synchronous and asynchronous. Concept of bus and register transfer language, state table, state diagram and state equations.

3

4

 

Memory Devices: Semiconductor memory - RAM, ROM; Magnetic core and surface memory- disk, drum, tape;  Access  time  and  cost  considerations:  Concepts  of  volatility,  random  access,  serial access, direct access, online and backup storage.

2

5

 

Basic CPU organization: Simplified functional block diagram of a CPU; Instruction execution process.

1

Books:

1.

Mano, M.M.: Digital Logic and Computer Design, Pearson

 

 

2.

Rajaraman V, Radhakrishnan : An introduction to Digital Computer Design. PHI

 

 

3.

Mano, M.M.; Computer System Architecture, Pearson

 

 

4.

Hamacher, Vranesic, Zaky: Computer organization, McGraw Hill. 

 

 

5

Uyemura . J.P.:  Digital Systems Design an integrated approach,   Cengage

 

 

6

 Leach : Digital Principles & Applications,7/e, TMH

 

 

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132103

Subject Name    : THEORY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  NIL

 

Theoretical computer science is a division or subset of general computer science and mathematics which focuses on more abstract or mathematical aspects of computing and includes the theory of computation This module introduces the theory of computation through a set of abstract machines that serve as models for computation - finite automata, pushdown automata, and Turing machines – and examines the relationship between these automata and formal languages. Additional topics beyond the automata classes themselves include deterministic and nondeterministic machines, regular expressions, context free grammars, undesirability, and the P = NP question.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Students will be able to understand the working principle of a finite automaton

2.     Students will be able to differentiate between DFA and NDFA

3.     Students will be able to understand the grammar used in Finite automata and  to define the language generated by the grammar

4.     Students will be able to classify the different languages

5.     An ability to define and use abstract models of computation such as finite and push-down automata, and analyze their relative expressive power.

6.     An ability to define, use, and convert between abstract machine models and formal languages.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Introductory Concept on Formal logic, revision of propositional and first orders predicate logic, conjunctive normal form, clausal form, Logic programming.

2

2

 

Functions and relation: Binary relation, types of relation , equivalence relation and equivalence class, closure of relation, function, different types of functions.

2

3

 

Logic: truth tables, algebra of propositions, logical arguments, predicate calculus

3

4

 

Concepts of Automata Theory: Automata, Computability and Complexity, Alphabets, Strings, Languages, Grammars.

1

5

 

Automata and Languages:

 

 

5.1

Finite Automata: Deterministic and non deterministic finite Automata, Equivalence of DFA & NFA, Finite Automata with Epsilon- Transitions.

2

 

5.2

Regular Expression (RE) and Languages: Building RE, operators of RE, Conversion of RE to Automata and Automata to RE. Application of RE and its algebraic laws.

2

 

5.3

Non Regular Languages: Pumping Lemma and its application.

1

6

 

Context Free Grammars and Languages:

 

 

6.1

Context-free Grammars: Definition and Derivation of languages. Ambiguity in Grammars and languages. CHOMSKY NORMAL FORM (CNF).

2

 

6.2

Pushdown – Automata: Definition, The language of a PDA, Equivalence of PDA and CFG’s.

2

 

6.3

Non-Context-free Languages: Application of Pumping Lemma for non- Context free languages.

1

7

 

Computability Theory:

 

 

7.1

Turing Machines: Notations, ID for Turing Machine, i.e., recursively enumerable languages, Acceptability and Halting, Multi Traces Turing Machine. The Church- Turing Thesis.

 

 

7.2

Variants of Turing Machines: Multitape Turing Machine, Non-Deterministic Turing Machine, Enumerator, Equivalence of one tape and multitape Turing Machine.

 

Books:

1.

Hopcroft, Motwani & Ullman: Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computation. 3rd Edn. LPE.

 

 

2.

Theory of Computation: Michael Sipser CENCAGE Learning

 

 

3

Martin : Introduction To Languages & Theory Of Computation, TMH

 

 

4.

Liu and Mahapatra, Discrete Mathematics, TMH

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132104

Subject Name    : ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  NIL

 

Accountants record, classify, summaries, interpret and communicate the financial information about a business.  However they do more than just prepare financial reports on the activities of an organization. Experienced accountants work strategically with the executive and management teams by providing expert financial advice on the impacts of management decisions, compliance and governance and the deployment of systems, resources and processes throughout the company. Through this course Students learn to apply accounting skills to a range of different managerial, business and problem-solving situations.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.   Recognize, read and use any of the common management accounting reports

2.   Prepare, or provide the necessary information for the preparation of budgets

3.   Cost current or proposed products, and know the contentious issues that will need to be addressed.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

1.1

Accounting concepts and principles, Accounting conventions, principles of Double-entry system of accounting, objectives and advantages of accounting;

2

 

1.2

Classification of Debit and Credit, cardinal Rules for Debit and credit, Journalising, Ledger postings, closing and balancing of Ledger Accounts, Subsidiary Books, types of cash Book;

3

2

3.1

Trial  balance,  Preparation  of  trading  Account,  Manufacturing  Account,  Profit  and loss Account  and  Balance  Sheet  for  Proprietary  concerns, 

3

 

3.2

Capital  Expenditures  and  revenue  Expenditures, Depreciation of Fixed Assets, Simple adjustments;

2

4

4.1

Financial management- Concept  and  importance,  its  increasing  role  in modern  times,  cost accounting  and  its  importance,  standard  costing  and  marginal  costing,  Break-even Analysis, ratio analyses,  type of ratios & usefulness, fund flow and  cash  flow, working  capital  cycle.

3

5

5.1

Introduction  to  computerised  accounting  system,  coding  logic, master  and transaction  files, documents  used  for  data  collection,  processing  of  different  files  and  outputs  obtained, automatic generation of profit and loss account and balance sheet.

2

Books:

1.

Chandra: Financial Management. TMH

 

 

2.

Shukla &Grewal, Cost Accounting

 

 

3.

Chawla,Juneza& Saxena Double Entry Book Keeping and Accounts

 

 

4.

Anole: Financial Accounting, prentice-Hall.

 

 

5.

Horngren and Sundem: Introduction to Financial Accounting, PH    Int.

 

 

6.

Murthy,U.S.; Management Finance, 2nd Edn., Vakils Fefers &    Simons Ltd.

 

 

7.

Van Home, James,C.: Financial Management and policy, PH Inc.

 

 

8.

Pandey, I.M.: Financial management, Vikas publications, 1979

 

 

9

Levy and Sarnat: Principles of Financial management, Prentice-   Hall.

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132105

Subject Name    : COMPUTER ORIENTED NUMERICAL METHODS

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  MCA 1.1 and MCA 1.3

 

Computer oriented methods for solving numerical problems in science and engineering; numerical solutions to systems of simultaneous linear equations, nonlinear algebraic equations (root solving), differentiation and integration, ordinary differential equations, interpolation, and curve fitting.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Be familiar with numerical interpolation and approximation of functions.

2.     Be familiar with numerical integration and differentiation 

3.     Be familiar with numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.

4.     Be familiar with numerical solutions of nonlinear equations in a single variable. 

5.     Be aware of the use of programming languages for the solution of numerical problems.  

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Interpolation-Polynomial Interpolation, difference tables and calculations of difference.

2

2

2.1

Numerical differentiation- Newton’s Interpolation, Lagrange’s interpolation and Newton’s divided difference formulae.

1 ½

 

2.2

Numerical integration- Trapezoidal rule,Simpson’s (1/3 and 3/8)rules, Gaussian Quadrature  formula , Romberg integration

1 ½

3

 

Simultaneous linear equations- Direct methods: Gauss elimination , Jacobi’s. Iterative methods: Gauss-Jordan , Gauss- Seidal

3

4

 

Solution of non linear equations of one variable- Iterative methods: Zeros of transcendental equation and zeros of polynomials using Bisection, Iterative, False-Position, Secant and Newton Raphson methods. Convergence of these methods

3

5

 

Ordinary differential equations of one and two variables- Euler’s method, Modified Eular’s method , Runga Kutta (2nd and 4th ) methods, Milne’s methods. Predictor – corrector methods.

4

 

 

 

 

Books:

1.

Gerald and Wheatley : Applied Numerical Analysis ,Pearson

 

 

2.

Niyogi : Numerical Analysis and algorithm ,TMGH

 

 

3.

Schilling and Harris : Applied numerical methods for Engineering, Cengage

 

 

4.

Scheld: Numerical Analysis, TMGH

 

 

5

Chapra : Numerical Methods For Engineers, TMH

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132116

Subject Name    : PROGRAMMING LABORATORY-I

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), ST-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Apply and practice logical ability to solve the problems.

2.     Understand C programming development environment, compiling, debugging, linking and executing a program using the development environment

3.     Analyzing the complexity of problems, Modularize the problems into small modules and then convert them into programs

4.     Understand and apply the in-built functions and customized functions for solving the problems.

5.     Understand and apply the pointers, memory allocation techniques and use of files for dealing with variety of problems.

6.     Document and present the algorithms, flowcharts and programs in form of user-manuals

 

Course Content :

 

LAB PART

PARA

Laboratory Content

Total  Weeks

1 (75%)

1.1

Understand the fundamentals of C programming.

2

 

1.2

Choose the loops and decision making statements to solve the problem.

3

 

1.3

Implement different Operations on arrays.

3

 

1.4

Use functions to solve the given problem.

2

 

1.5

Understand pointers, structures and unions.

2

 

1.6

Implement file Operations in C programming for a given application.

2

Books:

 

As given  CA132101

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA 2ND SEMESTER SYLLABUS

 

Paper                : CA132201

Subject Name    : DATA  AND FILE STRUCTURE

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132101

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     The student will learn a variety of algorithm design techniques and the factors on which the efficiency of an algorithm depends.

2.     Student will learn to analyze the best case, worst case and average case analysis of an algorithm.

3.     Students will be able to select an appropriate data structure for the successful implementation of a given problem.

4.     Students will be able to differentiate between linear and non linear data structure.

5.     Students will be able to learn about the operations that can be performed on different data structure and their real life applications.

6.     Students will be able to learn various methods of organizing and retrieving data.

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Fundamental Notions : Primitive and composite data types ; Time and Space Complexity of algorithms, Concept of Big-O, small-o & Big-W.

1

2

 

Data Structures : Linear List: Stacks, Queues, Arrays, Linked Lists, Circular & .Doubly Linked Lists.

2

3

 

Trees and Graphs : Introduction to Graph & Trees. Tree: Properties of trees; Pedant vertices in a tree; center of a tree; Rooted binary trees.Concepts of trees; Extended Binary trees; Complete Binary trees; General Trees. Binary Search Trees; Weight balanced and Height balanced trees; AVL Tree; Balanced Multi-Way Trees; Threaded Binary Trees.

3

4

 

Graph: Concept of graph, vertex set, edge set, connected graph,etc.,

Adjacency matrix, Path matrix, Warshall’s algorithm, Modified Warshall’s algorithm,

Adjacency list, Node list, Edge list.

Spanning trees – Spanning tree algorithms; Fundamental circuits spanning trees of weighted graph

2

5

 

File Structures :

Concepts of Fields, Records and Files; Concepts of Blocks, Clusters, Sectors.

Sequential File Organization, Variable length Records and Text Files; Indexing Structures like B-trees; ISAM; Hashing Techniques for Direct Files; Inverted lists; Multilists

2

6

 

Sorting and Searching:

Selection_sort, Insertion-sort, Bubble-sort, Quick-sort, Heap-sort, Merge-sort.

Searching Techniques; Binary search, Linear search,

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Books :

1

Abo,Hopcroft and Ullman , Data Structures and Algorithms,Addson Wesley Publishing Co.

 

 

2

Horowitz and Sahni , Fundamentals of Algorithms, Narosa Publishing House .

 

 

3

Cormen , Leiserson , Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, Mil Press & MeGraw - Hill Books Company.

 

 

4

Kunth.D., The Art of Computer Programming,Vol - 1 & 11 , Addison Wesely.

 

 

5

Rauthan & Patel, Expert Data Structures, Khanna Publication Co(Ltd ).

 

 

6

Weiss, Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++, Pearson Education

 

 

Paper                : CA132202

Subject Name    : COMPUTER  ARCHITECTURE  AND ORGANISATION (CAO)

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132102

 

Computer architecture is concerned with all aspects of the design and organization of the central processing unit and the integration of the CPU into the computer system itself. Architecture extends upward into computer software because a processor’s architecture must cooperate with the operating system and system software. It is impossible to design an operating system well without a knowledge of the underlying architecture. Moreover, the computer designer has to have an intimate understanding of software in order to implement the optimum architecture. Moreover, there is a tighter relationship between the computer architect and the compiler writer than at any time in the past.

 

Course Outcome:

1.     Understand the basic structure of a Computer system describing its units.

2.     Understand the basic computer arithmetic including floating point representations.

3.     Understand the basic concepts of memory and its addressing.

4.     Know the instruction format and instruction set used for a CPU and thus capable of writing the assembly language programs.

5.     Associative memory, Virtual memory and its working principles.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Overview: Simplified block diagram of a computer system, Instruction execution Model.

1

2

2.1

Processor Organization:  Instruction set, types, formats, addressing modes; Register set; Assembly and machine language programming.

2

 

2.2

Computer arithmetic: Review of addition and subtraction; Multiplication- basic, Booth´s, array; Division- basic, restoring, non-restoring; Floating point arithmetic.

2

3

 

Data path organization, concept of a bus.

Control structure: Hardware, Microprogramming.

3

4

4.1

Memory Organization:  Interfacing of memory with a processor; Cache memory; Introduction to virtual memory.

2

 

 

4.2

Input output organization:  Synchronization of data transfer: strobes and handshaking, I/O mapping and control: Program controlled, Interrupt, driven, DMA, Interrupt and DMA mechanisms.

3

5

 

Microprocessors: Introduction to Intel 8085 microprocessor and its peripheral chips, addressing modes and simple programming examples, A RISC processor (e.g. Motorola 88000) to introduce the basic concepts of RISC architecture,SISD,SIMD,MISD,MIMD,,. 

2

 

 

 

 

Books:

1.

Hamacher, Vranesic and Zaky: Computer Organization, TMGH

 

 

2.

Mano M.M: Computer system Architecture, PHI (EEE)

 

 

3.

William Stallings, Computer Organisation and architecture, Pearson

 

 

4

 Hennessey : Computer Architecture, Elsevier

 

 

5

 Stallings : Computer Organization & Architecture, PE

 

 

6

Hayes : Computer Architecture & Organization,MGH

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132203

Subject Name    : COMPUTER BASED OPTIMISATION TECHNIQUES

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132101 and CA132105

 

Solution of the global optimization problems based on a given fitness function. The optimization technique exploits genetic algorithms and is widely applicable to industrial and scientific tasks which include the effective use of neural network applications and complex computational packages in the distributed computer environment. Design and security of computer networks; pattern recognition; optimization of the oil and gas infrastructure; manufacturing electronic devices.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Understand the operation research techniques and classify different ranges of problems of operation research.

2.     The student will be able to formulate problems as abstract models which can be solved by generic algorithms.

3.     The student will be able to use knowledge of operations research to solve transportation problems, assignment problem, dynamic programming.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

1.1

Linear Programming:  Mathematical model, assumptions of linear programming,  Principles of simplex method, Revised simplex method, Applications, Duality, Dual Simplex  method, sensitivity analysis

3

 

1.2

Special type of linear programming problems: Transportation and assignment problems.

3

2

 

Integer programming: introduction, Branch and bound techniques, Assignment and travelling salesman problems with algorithmic approach.

4

3

 

Dynamic programming:  deterministic and probabilistic dynamic programming

3

4

 

 Queueing model: Specification and measure of queueing systems, Structures of basic queueing system? Definition and classification of stochastic processes, Characteristics of a Queing system, Interpretation of a model, Single Channel waiting line- (M/M/1) (∞: FIFO), Single channel finite population queue (M/M/1): (C/FIFO), Multichannel Queing problem (Infinite population) (M/M/C): (∞: FIFO), Earlang Distribution (M/Ek/1): (∞: FIFO).

2

Books

1

Natarajan, Balasubramani, Tamilasari : Operations Research , Pearson 

 

 

2

Gillett, B.G.:  Introduction to operations research - A Computer oriented Algorithmic approach, McGraw-Hill.

 

 

3

Srinath, L.S: Linear programming, East-west, New Delhi.

 

 

4

Hiller, F.S. and Liberman, G.J.: Introduction to Operations Research, Holden Day In

 

 

5

Taha:  Operations Research   , Pearson

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132204

Subject Name    : GRAPH THEORY

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132101and MCA CA132103

 

This Course includes various topics in Graph Theory including a selection from graph algorithms, connectivity, networks, planarity, graph colouring, graph symmetries. An introduction to Design Theory including a selection of topics from Latin squares, Steiner triple systems, balanced incomplete block designs, graph decompositions, projective and affine designs. This course serves as an introduction to major topics of modern enumerative and algebraic combinatory with emphasis on partition identities, young tableaux bijections, spanning trees in graphs, and random generation of combinatorial objects. There is some discussion of various applications and connections to other fields.

 

Course  Outcome:

 

1.     Understand the concept of a graph and its use in scientific and engineering problems.

2.     Identify different kinds of special graphs and its basic properties.

3.     Represent the graph as a data structure and store the graph the same in computer.

4.     Understand the basic principles of important graph algorithms such as finding shortest path, directed or undirected cycle, minimum spanning tree, maximum flow and minimum cut, etc.

5.     Understanding of the basic techniques and strategies of applying graph theory to solve advanced data structures and other real world problems.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Graph: Incidence and degree; Handshaking Lemma; Isomorphism; Sub graphs and Union of  graphs;  Connectedness;  Walks,  Paths  and  Circuits;  Components  and  Connectedness; Walks,  Paths  and  Circuits;  Components  and  Connectedness  algorithms;  Shortest  Path Algorithms, Eulerian graph, Fleury´s algorithm and Chinese postman problem; Hamiltonian graph - necessary and sufficient conditions; Travelling salesman; Bipartite graph.

3

2

 

Tree: Properties of  trees; Pedant vertices  in a  tree; Centre of a  tree; Rooted binary  trees; Spanning  trees  -    Spanning  tree  algorithms;  Fundamental  circuits;  Spanning  trees  of  a weighted  graph;  cut-sets  and  cut-vertices;  Fundamental  cut-sets;  Connectivity  and  separativity; network flow; max-flow min-cut theorem.

2

3

3.1

Planner  graph:    Combinatorial  and  geometric  duals;  Kuratowski´s  graph;  detection  of  planarity; Thickness and crossings

2

 

3.2

Matrix representations of graph: Incidence; Adjacency; matrices and their properties

2

4

 

Colourings: Chromatic number: Chromatic polynomial; The six and five colour theorems; The four colour problem.

1

5

5.1

Directed graphs:  Binary relations;  Directed  graphs  and  connectedness;  directed  trees; Aborecence; Polish method; Touranaments.

2

 

5.2

Counting of labelled trees: Cayley´s theorem; Counting methods; Polya theory.

2

6

 

Switching and coding theory and VLSI design

1

 

 

 

 

Books

1.

Deo, N.: Graph Theory with Applications to Engineering and Computer Science

 

 

2

Agnarsson:  Graph Theory  ,Pearson

 

 

3

Harary : Graph Theory, PHI(EEE). 

 

 

4

: West : Graph Theory, PHI

 

 

5

  Chartran : Introduction To Graph Theory, TMH

 

                                               

 

Paper                : CA132205

Subject Name    : PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  NIL

 

This course provides an elementary introduction to probability and statistics with applications. Topics include; basic probability models; combinatory; random variables; discrete and continuous probability distributions; statistical estimation and testing. This course also provides an introduction to probability theory, one- and two-dimensional random variables and statistical inference, and shows how these concepts are applied in decision-making processes. The topics covered in this course include moment estimates of random variables, properties of sums of random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

 

Course Outcome:

1.     Ability to use the distributions.

2.     Ability to test the hypothesis using suitable statistical test.

3.     Ability to apply these tests in their projects and research work

4.     Ability   to   calculate   coefficient   of correlation and regression lines

5.     Ability to apply queuing theory in real life situations

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Probability:

Probability Theory: sample spaces; Events and probability; Discrete Probability; Union, intersection and compliment of events; conditional probability; Bay´s Theorem; Random variables and Distribution: random variables, Discrete Probability Distribution - Binomial,  Poisson, Geometric and Hyper geometric distributions;  Density  functions; Continuous probability distribution - Uniform, Exponential, Normal, Student’s t,?2, Beta and  F - static. Expectations; Characteristics Functions.

7

2

 

 

Statistics:

Basic  statistics: Measures  of  central  tendencies- Mean, Median, Mode; Measures of dispersion:-Range,  Variance  and  Standard  deviation:  Frequency  distributions  and cumulative  frequency  distributions  and  cumulative  frequency

3

 

3

 

 

Moments  and  Moment generating  functions:  Linear  correlation  coefficient:  Linear and  Non-linear regression; Multiple correlation and multi-regression;

3

 

4

 

 

 

Sampling: Theory of sampling: Population and sample; sampling survey methods and estimation.

Statistical inference; testing of hypothesis and inference.

Central limit theorem.

2

 

 

 

 

Books

1

Hogg,Tanis and Rao: Probability and Statistical Inference , Pearson

 

 

2

Mendenhall,Beaver,  Beaver ,  Probability and Statistics,  Cengage.

 

 

3

Yule, U.G., Kendall, M.G: An Introduction to the Theory of statistics, Chalies Griffin and Co.Ltd.

 

 

4

Milton : Introduction To Probability & Statistics, TMH

 

 

5

Das : Statistical Methods, combined edition, TMH

 

 

6

  Leon & Garcia : Probability & Statistics, PE

 

                                                                                                                                                  

Paper                : CA132216

Subject Name    : PROGRAMMING LABORATORY-II

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), ST-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132201and CA132205

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Write , compile and execute programs related to data structures.

2.     Have a Clear idea about linear data structures such as stacks, queues and linked lists and their manipulation using C/ C++ programs.

3.     Have a Clear idea about non linear data structures trees and Graphs, and implement their operations.

4.     Implement different searching and sorting techniques. Compare different searching and sorting techniques.

 

 

LAB PART

PARA

Laboratory Content

Total  Weeks

1(75%)

1.1

Concept of Object oriented programming in C++

1

 

1.2

Simple link list, Stack, queues,

2

 

1.3

Single, double, circular Link lists, queues

2

 

1.4

graphs and trees, Several searching and sorting techniques, using Graphs and trees

3

 

1.5

B Tree, B+ Trees: Insertion deletion techniques

3

 

 

 

 

2(25%)

 

Simple programming on Numerical Methods

4

 

 

 

 

Books

 

As on CA132201and CA132205

 

 

MCA 3RD SEMESTER SYLLABUS

 

Paper                : CA132301

Subject Name    : SYSTEM SOFTWARE

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132101, CA132102, CA132102 

 

This course is an introduction to the design and implementation of system software. System software consists of a variety of programs that support the operation of a computer. System software was mainly (initially) written in assembly language. So the course will discuss assembly language, its programming and some most typical systems software including assembler (and linker, loader, macro processors) and compiler. The structure of a simple and a typical computer will be introduced and different operations/functions based on the structure will be discussed. This course covers the design and implementation of compiler and runtime systems for high-level languages, and examines the interaction between language design, compiler design, and runtime organization. Topics covered include lexical and syntactic analysis, handling of user-defined types and type-checking, context analysis, code generation and optimization, and memory management and runtime organization.

 

Course Outcome:

1.     Acquire and Demonstrate knowledge in different phases and passes of Compiler, and specifying different types of tokens by lexical analyzer, and also able to use the compiler tools like LEX, YACC, etc.

2.     Construct the LL, SLR, CLR and LALR parse table.

3.     Have the clear idea about assembler, linker, loader.

 

Course Content:

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Overview: Definition and classification of system software.

1

2

 

Assemblers: Assembly language, Assembly process, Data structures, Macros and macroprocessors.

3

3

 

Linkers and loaders: Basic concepts, Static and dynamic linking, shared libraries, loaders, overlays. Case study of the Unix linking system, Windows DLLs, OLEs.

4

4

 

Compilers: Introduction: Phases of a compiler, Languages and grammer, Chomshy hierarchy. Lexical analysis: Finite automata, Lexical analyzer, Lexical analyzer generator (LEX). Parsing:  Top-down and Bottom-up parsers, shift-reduce parser, recursive descent (operator precedence ) parser, LL(1), LR parsers, Parser generator  (YACC).

5

5

 

System Software Tools: Text Editor- Overview of editing process, user interface, editor structure, interactive debugging system, debugging functions and capabilities, relationship with other parts of the system, user interface criteria. Eg: LaTeX

2

 

 

 

 

Books:

1.

Aho,A.V., Sethi, and Ullman J.d: complier design.

 

 

2.

Dhandhere, System programming and operating systems, Tata    McGrawHill.

 

 

3.

Leland.L.Beck, System software, An introduction to System Programming, Pearson Education

 

 

3.

Louden, Compiler construction, Cengage

 

 

Paper                : CA132302

Subject Name    : DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM-I

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA 132201

 

To give the students the main concepts of database, design of the database, database models, ERD and normalization techniques, Physical Database design, query languages SQL. Distributed Database. Further the students have to practice and write some applications regarding the database.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Know about the basic database concepts with its importance.

2.     Know about the data models including Conceptual, representational data models.

3.     Design databases pertained to a practical problems in organizational data management.

4.     Design optimized databases using normalization.

5.     Have an idea about transaction processing , concurrency control mechanisms.

6.     Understand types of Data Base failures and Recovery techniques.

7.     Have the knowledge about the SQL/PL-SQL to manipulate and retrieve data from a relational database.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Introduction  :  What is DBMS , advantage of using DBMS ,data models (object based logical models , record based logical models ) , DBMS users , overall system structure

1

2

 

Entity Relationship models: ER diagrams , generalization , specialization , aggregation . Database models - Network model , Hierarchical model , and Relational model.

2

3

 

Relational Database : Underlying concepts , structure , study of relational languages (relational algebra , tuple relational calculus , domain relational calculus , SQL , QBE ) , storage and file structure , file organization .

Indexing : Primary and secondary , B+ tree indexed files , B - tree indexed files , static and dynamic hashing , multiple key access , grid files , partitioned hashing . 

3

4

 

Relational Data Base Design : Integrity constraints ( domain constraints , referential , assertions , triggers , functional dependencies ) , Normalization (using FDs , multivalued dependencies , join dependencies ) , Domain -key normal form.

2

5

 

Transactions : Concept , state , ACID properties , serializability and recoverability , testing for serializability .

Concurrency Control : Lock - based , protocols , timestamp based protocols , validation based protocols , multiversion schemes , deadlock handling .

2

6

 

Recovery System : Log based recovery (deferred and immediate database modification ), checkpoints , shadow paging , recovery with concurrent with transactions , buffer managements in recovery , recovery from loss of non - volatile storage , logical undo logging , transaction rollback , restart recovery , fuzzy checkpointing.

3

 

 

 

 

Books:

1

Elmarsi and Navathe, fundamentals of Database Systems , Norsa publishing Company,1989

 

 

2

J.D . Ullman , Principles of Database Systems , Galgotia Publishing Private Limited

 

 

3

Silberschatz, Korth and Sudersan , Principles of Database Systems Mc GrawHill Publication

 

 

4

C.J .Date  An Introduction to Database systems , Vol - I And Vol II Addison - Wesley Publishing   Company.

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132303

Subject             : MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  NIL

 

This course examines the role of information technology, and its management, in supporting an organization’s (internally- and externally-focused) operations and strategies. Particular attention is given to issues associated with the funding and building of business and technology architectures to enable efficient, effective, and adaptable operational, tactical and strategic actions.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Describe the major technological, organizational, behavioral, and ethical issues facing today’s information systems professional.

2.     Describe IT strategy formulation and explain its alignment with organizational strategy.

3.     Conduct research on and describe, several current and emerging technologies and explain their impact on corporate performance.

4.     Explain the difference between supporting a business with technology and driving a business with technology.

5.     Describe ways in which technology can provide an organization with competitive advantages.

6.     Describe how technology facilitates and enhances both operational and strategic decision making in an organization.

6.

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1.

 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (MIS) (20% credit): Organization and Information Systems, Changing Environment and its impact on Business - The IT/IS and its influence. The Organization: Structure, Managers and activities - Data, information and its attributes - The level of people and their information needs - Types of Decisions and information - Information System, categorization of information on the basis of nature and characteristics.

2

2

 

KINDS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (20% credit): Transaction Processing System (TPS) - Office Automation System (OAS) - Management Information System (MIS) - Decision Support System (DSS) and Group Decision Support System (GDSS) - Expert System (ES) - Executive Support System (EIS or ESS).

2

3

 

Computer in Telecommunication and Networks (20% credit): Communication, Media, Modems & Channels - LAN, MAN & WAN - Network Topologies, Internet, Intranet and Extranet. Wireless technologies like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Wi-Max.

3

4

 

Manufacturing and Service Systems (10% credit): Information systems for Accounting, Finance, Production and Manufacturing, Marketing and HRM functions - IS in hospital, hotel, bank.

2

5

 

 Enterprise System (10% credit): Enterprise Resources Planning (ERP): Features, selection criteria, merits, issues and challenges in Implementation - Supply Chain Management (SCM): Features, Modules in SCM - Customer Relationship Management (CRM): Phases. Knowledge Management and e-governance.

2

6

 

Choice of IT (10% credit): Nature of IT decision - Strategic decision - Configuration design and evaluation Information technology implementation plan.

2

7

 

Security and Ethical Challenges (10% credit): Ethical responsibilities of Business Professionals – Business, technology. Computer crime – Hacking, cyber theft, unauthorized use at work. Piracy – software and intellectual property. Privacy Issues and the Internet Privacy. Challenges – working condition, individuals. Health and Social Issues, Ergonomics and cyber terrorism.

2

Books

1.

“Management Information Systems”, Kenneth J Laudon, Jane P. Laudon, Pearson/PHI,10/e, 2007

 

 

2.

“Management Information Systems”, W. S. Jawadekar, Tata McGraw Hill Edition, 3/e, 2004

 

 

3.

MIS by Ralph Stair

 

Ref.

 

1. “Introduction to Information System”, James A. O’ Brien, Tata  McGraw Hill, 12th Edtion.

2. “Management Information Systems”, S.Sadagopan, PHI, 1/e, 2005

3. “Management Information Systems”, Effy Oz, Thomson Course Technology, 3/e, 2003

4. Corporate Information Strategy and Management”, Lynda M AppleGate, Robert D Austin et al, Tata McGraw Hill, 7th Edition.

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132304

Subject Name    : OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132101

 

This course provides an introduction to software construction using an object-oriented approach.Acquire programming skills in connection with engineering science or technology. Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm that uses "objects" and their interactions to design applications and computer programs. It is based on several techniques, including inheritance, modularity, polymorphism, and encapsulation. Many modern programming languages now support OOP. From this module, we will learn the art of the object-oriented programming using JAVA Programming Language after having a background in the procedural paradigm that was introduced in the module “Programming Fundamentals".

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     An understanding of the principles and practice of object oriented analysis and design in the construction of robust, maintainable programs which satisfy their requirements

2.     Will  be able to  explain   the   object- oriented software development process, including object-oriented methodologies and work flows

3.     To be able to design UML-diagrams viz. use case diagram, class diagram, object diagram, activity diagram, sequence diagram, state flow diagram

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Part - I :  Object Oriented Programming

Object, Class. State and Behavior of an object, Attributes and Operations of a class. Encapsulation and Data Hiding: Interface, Implementation, Access modifiers. Inheritance: Reusing, Is_a relationship, Generalization, Specialization, superclass and subclass, Abstraction. Composition:  Has_a relationship, Aggregation, Association, Composition. Multiplicity and cardinality. Polymorphism, getter & setter, Operator overloading. Local attributes, Object attributes, Class attributes. Constructor: Default Constructor, Multiple Constructor, Constructor overloading. Error Handling.

6

2

 

2.1

 

 

2.2

 

 

2.3

Part – II : Object Oriented Design

Class Model: Class and Object, Link and Association, Generalization and Inheritance, OCL. Enumeration, Multiplicity, Scope, Visibility, Association End Name, Ordering, Bags and Sequences, aggregation, Constraints on Objects, Generalization Sets and Links.

State Model: Signal Events and Change Events; States, Transitions and Conditions. State Diagrams: Basic notations, One-shot State Diagrams, Activity Effects, Do-Activities, Entry and Exit Activities, Completion Transition, Sending Signals, Nested States, Concurrency and Synchronization of Concurrent Activities.

Interaction Model: Use Case Models with Include, Extend, Generalization, Sequence Models. Activity Models, sending & receiving signals, swimlanes, Object flows.

4

3

 

Part-III : Development Stages and Life Cycles

System conception, Analysis, System design, Class design, Implementation, Testing, Training, Deployment and Maintenance.

5

Books

1.

Matt Weisfeld: The Object Oriented Thought Process, Addison-Wesley.

 

 

2.

Rambaugh et al.: Object Oriented Modeling and Design, PHI (EEE).

 

 

3.

Rambaugh Booch, Jackobson : Unified Modelling Language Referance Mannual.

 

 

4.

Barclay, Savage : Object-Oriented Design with UML and Java, Elsevier Butterworth- Heinemann

 

 

Paper                : CA132305

Subject Name    : COMPUTER GRAPHICS & MULTIMEDIA(CGM)

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre-requisite      : CA132201

 

The basic principles and practices of interactive computer graphics and multimedia systems are covered in this introductory course. The design and implementation of state-of-the-art computer graphic rendering and visual multimedia systems are the main part of the course. The sub-topics of the course deal with specific input/output hardware devices and their technology, software and hardware standards, programming methods for implementing 3-dimensional graphical applications and interactive multimedia applications, and a study and evaluation of the effectiveness of graphic/multimedia communications. A large component of the class is the building of a large-scale application.

 

Course Outcome:

1.       Students will demonstrate an understanding of contemporary graphics hardware.

2.       To provide students with an understanding of the algorithms and theories that form the basis of computer graphics and modeling(draw lines, circles and polygons)

3.       To provide students with an understanding the application of transformation techniques to scale, rotate and translate the object.

4.       A competence to the Line clipping and Polygon Clipping techniques

5.       To provide  knowledge of different methods of enlarging visible portion of drawing

6.       To give students skills necessary in the production of 3D models, lighting, and rendering.

7.       Analyze and explain various technologies involved to support multimedia application development.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Display Devices: Line and point plotting Systems; Raster, vector, pixel and point plotters, Continual refresh and storage displays, Digital frame buffer , Plasma panel displays, Very high resolution devices , High - speed drawing , Display processors , Character generators , Color-display techniques ( Shadow mask and penetration CRT, color look - up tables , analog false colours , hard copy color printers ) .

2

2

 

Display Description : Screen co - ordinates , user co - ordinates ; Graphical data structures ( compressed incremental list, vector list, use of homogeneous co-ordinates ) ; Display code generation ; Graphical functions ; The view algorithms; Two - dimensional transformation .

3

3

 

Interactive Graphics : Pointing and positioning devices (cursor,light pen, digitizing tablet, the mouse , track balls) ,  Interactive graphical techniques. Positioning , Elastic lines , Inking , zooming , panning , clipping , scissoring,windowing,censoring .

2

4

 

Graphic Language Primitives constants , actions , operators

2

5

 

3 -D Graphics: Wire - frame perspective display, Perspective depth, Projective transformations, Hidden line and surface elimination, Transparent solids Shadowing .

(GKS is to be used as the standard teaching tool).

2

6

 

Concept of Image Processing : Techniques and applications.

Multimedia : Introduction to multimedia, Concept of hypertext and hypermedia, Multimedia applications, Basics of Animation, Music and sounds, Audio basic Concepts, Digital and Analog basic concepts. MIDI hardware, MIDI messages, MIDI files, Video: Basic Concepts, Analog and digital video. Imaging and graphics, Image formats, Graphic formats, File format, Image quality and  Graphic systems, Compression, Image Compression, Sound Compression, Video Compression.

3

 

 

 

 

Books:

1

Computer Graphics : Hearn ID.and Baker.P.M. PHI

 

 

2

Principles of Interactive computer graghics  : Newman W.Sproule, R.F. Mcgraw Hill

 

 

Paper                : CA132316

Subject Name    : PROGRAMMING LABORATORY-III

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20),ST-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132216

 

The module introduces the object-oriented approach and emphasizes on the concepts of classes, templates, friend classes, inheritance, and virtual functions. Program design will be addressed by the use of a number of Lab work and assignments in which complete programs will be developed from informal requirements expressed in English and this development will include the process of identifying objects, classes, and methods.

 

Course Outcome:

 

Java Programming :

1.     Write, compile, and execute Java programs that may include basic data types and control flow constructs.

2.     Write, compile and execute Java programs using object oriented features and exception handling and introduction to Applet Programming.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Laboratory Content

Total  Weeks

1 (75%)

1.1

Concept of Object oriented programming in Java 2.6

2

 

1.2

Example of Inheritance, Multiple inheritance, Polymorphism related programs

5

 

1.3

Designing of DFD, Class Diagram with UML/SE Tools

4

2(25%)

 

Programs related to Computer graphics

4

Books:

 

As given in MCA 3.4 and MCA 3.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA 4TH SEMESTER SYLLABUS

 

Paper                : CA132401

Subject Name    : OPERATING SYSTEMS

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   :  CA132202

 

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice behind modern computer operating systems. Topics will include what an operating system does (and doesn´t) do, system calls and interfaces, processes, concurrent programming, resource scheduling and management (of the CPU, memory, etc.), virtual memory, deadlocks, distributed systems and algorithms, networked computing and programming, and security. We will approach the subject from both a theoretical perspective (what are the abstractions and algorithms?) as well as a practical one (what are the mechanisms and how are they built?).

 

Course Outcome:

1.     Students should know the importance of the study Operating Systems and they must aware about the Popular Operating systems used in PC´s, Mobiles and Servers.

2.     Should know how To Protect and safegurd operating system from Virus,attacks and hacking.

3.     Students should  Know Programming for tuning and increasing perormance of the Operating systems. Batch Programming , Registry Edit, Performance monitoring and tuning)

4.     Students  must aquire a good idea about the design of an operating system, its use with different applications.

5.     Students Should know the installations and tuning of Popular Operating Systems.

6.     Latest Windows version , Service Pack utilities, Basic tools like Multimedia,  latest Linux / Fedora , Winows Server-2008, latest software packages and their tuning including DBMS software

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Overview: Evolution, current status and future trends. Structural overview.

1

2

 

Process concepts: Process states, process control block, process scheduling algorithms. Support for concurrent processes: Mutual exclusion, shared data, critical sections, busy form of waiting, lock and unlock primitives, synchronization, block and wakeup. Inter process communication issues, primitives.

5

3

 

System Deadlock: Prevention, detection and avoidance.

2

4

 

Memory management:  Contiguous and non-contiguous allocation, virtual memory, segmentation, paging, page scheduling and replacement algorithms.

4

5

 

File Systems: Management, protection mechanisms.  I/O management, disk scheduling.

Design of UNIX, LINUX- a case study.

An overview of network and distributed operating systems.

3

 

 

 

 

Books:

1.

Silberschatz  A,  Galvin  P:  Operating  system  concepts,  4th  ed. AWP.

 

 

2.

Milenkovic M.: Operating System- Concepts and Design, MGH Tanenbaum

 

 

3.

Operating System- Design and Implementation,    PHI (EEE).

 

 

4.

Bach, M.: Design of the UNIX operating system, PHI (EEE).

 

 

5.

Deitel, Deitel, choffnes, Operating systems, Pearson

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132402

Subject name    : SOFTWARE ENGINEERING.

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre-requisite      : NIL

 

To introduce the various stages of system level development and design, and the models used come up with real system SW creation. Development with reuse. Verification and validation: Test process. test planning. Testing strategies. Defect testing. Static verification. Engineering Design: Process. design strategies. Design quality. Architectural design: System structuring. Control models. Modular decomposition. Domain-specific architectures. Object oriented design. Function-oriented design. Real - time system design. User interface design.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Apply software engineering principles and techniques to the software development life cycles.

2.     Manage the development of software systems

3.     Produce efficient, reliable, robust and cost-effective software solutions

4.     Analyze, design, verify, validate, implement, apply, and maintain software systems

5.     Work as an effective member or leader of software engineering teams

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

                                     CONTENT

Weeks

1

 

Overview of system analysis and design(credit):  Information systems concepts, system environment, elements of a system, characteristics and types, system development life cycle.

2

2

 

Introduction to software engineering : (credit) Basic concepts of SE, different phases of a software development life cycle, life cycle models, planning software project.

2

3

 

Software requirements engineering process(credit): Functional and non functional requirements, user requirements, system requirements, the SRS document,requirements elicitation and analysis, system modelling, system modelling tools, DFD,DD,UML etc.

2

4

 

Software design (credit):  Concenpt of fundamental design approaches top down and bottom up, structured, object based and object oriented design, modular degign, architectural design, user interface design.

3

5

 

Software testing and maintenance (credit): Concepts of software testing, type of testing, testing strategies, post implementation review and software maintenance.

2

6

 

Software project and quality management (credit): Measures and measurements, cost estimation, cocomo model, scheduling, quality concepts, software reliability and quality standards.

1

7

 

Software risk management (credit):Software risks, risk strategies risk identification, risk projection, risk refinement.

2

Books

 

1.Awad.E.H..System analysis and design

2.Pressman. R.S..Software Engineering: A practitioner’s Approach. Mc Graw-Hill

 

 

 

3.Sommerville, Software Engineering, Pearson education

 

 

 

4. Rajib Mall; Software Engineering,.

 

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132403

Subject name                : DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM-II

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre-requisite      : CA132302

 

This course covers advanced database management system design principles and techniques. The course materials will be drawn from both classic and recent research literature. Possible topics include access methods, query processing and optimization, transaction processing, distributed databases, object-oriented and object-relational databases.

 

Course Outcome:

 

1.     Know about storage structure of databases and different access paths to retrieve data from database.

2.     Know about the optimization of query thus use it in program design.

3.     Know about the data representation and manipulation in parallel and distributed databases.

4.     Have an idea about object oriented databases and using OO and relational concept as Object relational databases.

5.     Understand the basic concepts of data security and integrity and practically apply the same in real life situations.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Query Processing : Study of algorithms for selection operations , sorting , join operations , projection , set operations , aggregation ; measurement of cost , evaluation of expressions, transformation of relational expressions , optimization techniques.

3

2

 

Parallel Databases : Introductory concepts ,partitioning techniques , interoperation parallelism - parallel sort (range partitioning sort, parallel external sort-merge ), parallel join ( partitioned join, fragment-and-replicate join, parallel hash join ), interoperation parallelism ( pipelined, independent ).

3

3

 

Distributed Databases : Replication and fragmentation, network transparency, join processing, distributed transaction processing, two-phase and three-phase commit protocols, handling failure, coordinator selection, concurrency control ( locking, timestamping ), deadlock handling ( centralized, fully distributed ), multidatabase systems.

3

4

 

Object Oriented Databases : Object classes, inheritance, DAG representation, object identity and persistence ( brief introduction to ODMG C++ ), storage structure for object oriented databases.Security and Integrity : Violations, authorization, views, privileges, granting privileges, security specification in SQL.

2

5

 

Introductory concepts on following topics : Data mining and data warehousing, multimedia databases, distributed information systems, information retrieval systems, spatial and graphical databases, transactions processing monitors, transactional workflows, active and main memory databases.

( Example and case studies from ORACLE to be discuss in the course )

3

Books

1

Elmasari and Navathe, Fundamentals Of Database System, Narosa Publishing Company, 1989.

 

 

2

J.D. Ullman, principles of Database Systems, Galgotia Publishing Private Limited.

 

 

3

Silberschats, Kroth and Sudershan, Principles of Database Systems, McGraw Hill Publication.

 

 

4

C.J. Date, An Introduction to Database Systems, Vol-I and Vol-II, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.

 

 

 

Paper                : CA132404

Subject Name    : COMPUTER NETWORKS

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   : CA132102

 

Basic concepts in networking, the OSI model, error detection codes, flow control.Data communications, network architectures, communication protocols, data link control, medium access control; introduction to local area networks metropolitan area networks and wide area networks; introduction to Internet and TCP/IP.

 

Course Outcome:

1.       Able to explain the importance of data communications and the Internet in supporting business communications and daily activities.

2.       Able to explain how communication works in data networks and the Internet.

3.       Recognize the different internetworking devices and their functions.

4.       Explain the role of protocols in networking.

5.       Analyze the services and features of the various layers of data networks.

6.       Design, calculate, and apply subnet masks and addresses to fulfil networking requirements.

7.       Analyze the features and operations of various application layer protocols such as Http, DNS, and SMTP.

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Overview: Goals of networking, types, application, topologies, Switching techniques, Standards, performance issues.

 

Network Architecture:  ISO-OSI reference model, design philosophy, layer, protocol, interface, and service concepts. Layer-wise    functionality

3

3

 

Physical Layer: Concepts of data transmission, modulation and multiplexing methods, modem, encoding methods, communication media, standard protocols. Medium Access Control sublayer – channel allocation, ALOHA, CSMA, CSMA/CD, token ring, token bus, Standard LAN/WAN, MAC Protocols. Protocols (IEEE 802.X), satellite networks.

3

 

4

 

Data link layer: Framing, error control techniques, data link protocols and their performance. Sliding window protocols, examples of DLL protocols.

3

5

 

Introduction to Network layer

Overview of physical layer,data link layer & MAC.

Network Layer: Routing, Congestion and deadlock control algorithms.

Internetworking issues and devices, gateways, bridges and routers, IP v4/v6 & X. 25 protocols.

Transport layer: Connection management, ICP, X.25.

Sessionand presentation layer: Remote procedure call. Data Compression method. Data encryption and decryption.

Application layer: Email, Remote login, File transfer, Network file system.

Network security-issues, threats, attacks to networks, design of security system, recent trends in network security.

Advance concepts in computer networking wireless network, ad hock networks etc.

4

 

 

 

Books:

1.

Tanenbaum A.S., Computer Network, PHI (EEE).

 

 

2.

Stalling, Data and Computer Communication, PHI (EEE).

 

 

3.

Stevens, UNIX Network Programming, PHI (EEE)

 

 

4.

Forouzan, Data communication and networking, 4th Edn, TMGH

 

 

Paper                : CA132405                  

Subject Name    : DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   : CA132101, CA132201

 

Introduction to fundamental techniques for designing and analyzing algorithms, including asymptotic analysis; divide-and-conquer algorithms and recurrences; greedy algorithms; data structures; dynamic programming; graph algorithms; and randomized algorithms.

 

Course Outcome:

1.     Able to learn about the basic properties of an algorithm and what are the important points one has to consider while designing an    efficient and correct algorithm.

2.     Able to analyze the running time of an algorithm for all possible input.

3.     Able to learn how the running time of an algorithm increases with the increase in size of input and how this running time can be described with the help of asymptotic notation.

4.     Able to learn various methods of solving a recurrence of a divide and conquer algorithm

5.     Able to learn and analyze a variety of algorithm design techniques such as dynamic programming, greedy methods divide and conquer strategy.

6.     Able learn about various classes of problems and will be able to differentiate between decision problem and optimization problem

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Algorithms: Models of Computation, Space and Time Complexity, Growth of functions, Upper and Lower bounds, Recurrences.

3

2

 

Paradigms: Divide -and -Conquer, Branch and Bound, Backtracking, Dynamic Programming, Greedy Method.

2

3

 

Analysis of sorting, Graph & Data Structures based Algorithms:

3

 

3.1

Sorting algorithms: Insertion sort, Merge sort, Heap sort, Quick sort, Linear Time sorting algorithms(Count sort, Radix sort, Bucket sort)

 

 

3.2

Graph Algorithms: BFS, DFS, Topological sort, Spanning trees

2

 

3.3

Data Structure based Algorithms : Hashing algorithms, BST, B-Trees

3

4

 

Introduction to NP-Completeness: The class P, The class NP, Polynomial reducibility NP- Completeness, NP-Completeness proofs. Examples of NP-Complete problems.

2

 

 

 

 

Books:

1.

Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, Stein: Introduction to algorithms, PHI

 

 

2.

Manber, Udi: Introduction to Algorithms. 2/e Addison-Wesley,1994

 

 

3

Aho, Hopcroft and Ullman: The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms, PE

 

 

4

G. Brassard and P. Bratley: Fundamentals of Algorithms. Prentice Hall, 1995.

 

 

5

Dasgupta : Algorithms, TMH

 

Paper                : CA132416

Subject Name    : PROGRAMMING LABORATORY-IV

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), ST-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

Pre – requisite   : CA132206

 

Course Outcome:

 

Oracle PL/SQL:

1.     Understand the basic concepts of relational databases

2.     Will be able to write and execute DDL statements and DML statements which includes constraints, using aggregate functions & joins

3.     Will be able to write and execute Store Procedure , Cursor and Trigger.

4.     Build dynamic web pages with embedded SQL.

5.     Basic UNIX command and shell programming.

 

 

UNIT

PARA

Laboratory Content

Total  Weeks

1 (75%)

 

Design of relational databases in SQL Server, Oracle Server, Extensive use of SQL and PL/SQL statements

11

2(25%)

 

Unix/Linux  shell programming.

4

 

 

MCA 5TH SEMESTER SYLLABUS

 

Paper                : CA132501                  

Subject Name    : DATA WAREHOUSING & DATA MINING

Marks               : CE-20(WT 20), MSE-50(WT 20), ESE-100(WT 60)

 

Data Mining studies algorithms and computational paradigms that allow computers to find patterns and regularities in databases, perform prediction and forecasting, and generally improve their performance through interaction with data. It is currently regarded as the key element of a more general process called Knowledge Discovery that deals with extracting useful knowledge from raw data. The knowledge discovery process includes data selection, cleaning, coding, using different statistical, pattern recognition and machine learning techniques, and reporting and visualization of the generated structures. The course will cover all these issues and will illustrate the whole process by examples of practical applications.   The students will use recent Data Mining software

 

Course Outcome:

1.     The students will be able to develop practical work of Data Mining(DM) techniques and design hypotheses based on the analysis to conceptualize a DM solution to a practical problem.

2.     The students will be able to discuss the role of data warehousing and enterprise intelligence in industry and government.

3.     The students can be able to evaluate and select appropriate data-mining algorithms and apply, and interpret and report the output appropriately.

4.     The students will be able to explore OLAP, and devise efficient & cost effective methods for maintaining Data Warehouses

 

Course Content:

 

UNIT

PARA

Content

Weeks

1

 

Introduction to Data Warehousing:

 

Basic Concepts: Characteristics of Data Warehouse, DSS, Differences between Data Warehouse and Database Systems, Data Warehouse architecture and its components, Metadata, Data mart, Warehouse versus Data Mining (OLTP & OLAP), OLAP tools, Data Cubes, Multidimensional Data.

 

2

2

 

Introduction to Data Mining:

Basic Concepts: Data Mining, Kinds of data that can be mined, Data Mining versus Database Systems, KDD, Data Preparation, Cleaning and Visualization.

 

Data Mining Techniques:

Association Rule: What is an association rule? Mining association rules, Frequent sets and Border sets, Algorithms for mining association rules- Apriori Algorithm, Pincer-Search Algorithm, Border Algorithm, FP-Tree Growth Algorithm, generalized association rule, association rule with item constraints

3

3

 

Clustering: Hierarchical versus Partitional clustering, Types of data in clustering, Partitional Algorithms- K-means, K-medoids, PAM, CLARA, CLARANS. Density based clustering algorithm- DBSCAN. Hierarchical Algorithms- BIRCH, CURE. Categorical clustering Algorithms- ROCK, CACTUS

3

4